Infographic: Pioneering the Path to Revolutionize Finance

Adaptive insights, cloud cpm software, corporate performance management, business budgeting software, budgeting and forecasting, visual analytics, financial reporting software, financial consolidation

Click the image above to view the full infographic.

It’s been an exciting journey along the way to record growth, tremendous customer success, and the development of a cloud CPM & BI solution that fundamentally changes the way finance leaders fulfill their roles and influence their organizations.

We’ve embraced innovation and risk in overcoming challenges throughout Adaptive’s history, and very tangible results have followed. Those results include the industry’s highest customer satisfaction ratings, and the growth of our international customer base to include more than 2,500 organizations in 85 countries worldwide.

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Product Tip Tuesday: Creating A Variance Report using Adaptive’s Built-In Reporting

Adaptive insights, cloud cpm software, corporate performance management, business budgeting software, budgeting and forecasting, visual analytics, financial reporting software

There are a lot of helpful tips and best practices to share with Adaptive customers as we pick back up our Product Tip Tuesday series in 2015. But with our intuitive and self-serving financial reporting features being one of our most popular benefits, we decided to kickoff this year’s series with a quick explanation of how to create variance reports using our built-in reporting feature.

Reports are used to communicate vital facts and figures to stakeholders throughout the organization. Unfortunately, the traditional tools used to create reports lack adequate drill-down capabilities, are subject to formatting challenges, and require painstaking manual measures that leave crucial data vulnerable to error. And when a manager needs a report quickly, spending hours compiling the information is just not scalable.

Adaptive’s web-based report builder allows users to quickly and easily create management and ad-hoc reports. With easy-to-use drag-and-drop and drill-down capabilities , users can easily provide commentary on variance reports and create new reports on the fly. It’s a true self-service style that leads to quick answers to important questions. Here’s how to get those answers.

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Adaptive Helps Gentiva Save One Million Annually, Achieve 751% ROI

 

How much is an investment in modern technology actually worth to today’s fast-growing, innovative organizations? In the case of Gentiva Health Services, the largest provider of home health and hospice services in the U.S., it’s worth roughly $1 million per year in average annual benefits.

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5 Tech Trends to Track in 2015

Adaptive insights, cloud cpm software, corporate performance management, business budgeting software, budgeting and forecasting, visual analytics, financial reporting software, financial consolidationEach New Year marks the inevitable onset of new trends, jump-starting the unofficial task of establishing a new set of do’s and don’ts. In 2014, some projections focused on the impact of skyrocketing mobile usage on businesses, Bitcoin’s volatile but consistent growth, and how user-driven marketplaces would continue to flourish as venture potential. Others concentrated on predicting the growth rate of the overall cloud market, the changing role of cloud service providers, and how much companies would spend on big data analytics.

And as is the nature of trends, the idea of what will be impactful in 2015 most definitely differs from what was considered influential in 2014. In a Fortune Magazine column last week, Sergio Monsalve of Norwest Venture Partners, an Adaptive Investor, offered his predictions as to which technology megatrends will define 2015. Adaptive Insights Senior Director Paul Turner also weighed-in with his 2015 cloud industry forecasts.

Here’s what we think are the five of their most interesting trends to track throughout 2015. You can find the full set of predictions from Paul and Sergio in the Adaptive News Section.

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The Insider’s Guide to Buying Enterprise Software

Adaptive insights, cloud cpm software, corporate performance management, business budgeting software, budgeting and forecasting, visual analytics, financial reporting software, financial consolidationAfter being in the software industry for nearly 20 years – having sold software, demoed it, implemented it, developed it, and marketed it – and bought quite a bit of it too, I’m still surprised by how many buyers don’t follow some basic ground rules when they’re making such a big decision. Asking some basic questions and doing some key research yourself can make all the difference between success and failure.

Let’s face it, it’s easy to build some requirements that you need and then glide along the sales process – sitting through the vendor sales presentations, seeing the demos, reading the success stories, getting a few references, and then signing the quote. But the best buyers really get inside the process – and follow seven key ground rules.

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The Technology Shift of 1914: Lessons We Can Learn 100 Years Later

Adaptive insights, cloud cpm software, corporate performance management, business budgeting software, budgeting and forecasting, visual analytics, financial reporting software, financial consolidationIn 1914 there were more than 4,600 of these companies in the United States alone, a competitive and vibrant industry that had supported tens of thousands of workers, unchallenged for hundreds of years. Entire careers revolved around them – with professionals and specialists, skilled in the complexity and artistry behind their products. An entire supply chain existed – from suppliers, to manufacturers, to makers of essential artifacts like the “buggy whip” to support them.

Flint and Cincinnati led production, while a city such as Amesbury in Massachusetts was one of many thriving towns that was home to more than 26 companies in the 1850s alone. Long forgotten businesses like George Adams & Sons, Loud Brothers, H. G. & H. W. Steven and William Chase & Sons were humming away, struggling to meet spiraling customer demand.

The industry peaked in the 1890’s with 13,000+ companies. Yet by 1925, there were just 150 of them in the US. By 1929, just 88. In a mere 15 years, 98% of an industry had been wiped out.

The industry, of course, is that of the “chaisemaker.” Even the name itself has fallen out of use (Microsoft Word is telling me I have a typo!) More commonly, you’ll know the industry as that of the carriage makers.

Some within the carriage making industry saw the automobile as simply a passing fad and couldn’t imagine a future without the horse drawn carriage. Few understood the fundamental technology shift that was underway and how it would disrupt their businesses to the core.

While many of the carriage makers were much better capitalized, had great commercial reach and distribution, and better brand recognition than their auto-making peers, they almost all failed to adapt to a technology shift. Just a few made the leap. In fact, Studebaker was one of only two top-ranked carriage makers that embraced the destruction of their old business, eventually retooling their entire production to manufacture automobiles instead. Companies that tried to hang on to the past, or simply apply old world skills and technology to the new world simply failed to exist.

Not just the carriage makers were wiped out. But the entire ecosystem that supported them. The “buggy whip” was an essential accessory for any erstwhile coach driver. An entire cottage industry in itself, the industry and the phrase itself crumbling in the face of disruption.

And here we stand today with another disruption underway: The demise of on-premise software, with an entire ecosystem that’s surrounding it, and the rise of cloud computing. What lessons can we learn from the shift from carriage to car?

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Financial Faceoff: Taking the Poker Game Out Of The Budgeting And Forecasting Process

world-series-pokerAnnual budgeting and forecasting season has come to pass, along with the all too familiar middle management and executive negotiation tactics. We all know the methods used to create favorable departmental budgets and forecasts:

Departmental managers asking for more than what’s required with the hope of agreeing on the budget that they actually want. Junior managers promising unprecedented results in exchange for executive support and an investment in their new ideas. And of course, the seasoned managers warning of large-scale consequences to the company if a specific budget is cut.

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